5OS07 Well-being at Work

5OS07 Well-being at Work

Students will learn about the notion of well-being and its importance in the workplace by exploring this lesson. It focuses on the interconnectedness of health, work, and general well-being and how this interdependence intersects with organisational strategy and people management. The section primarily focuses on the key components of well-being programmes, assessing stakeholder involvement, organisational responsibilities, and impacts on individuals and organisations.

Order Now

What You Will Learn

Students will study how to manage employee well-being in the workplace to meet business goals. They will identify the key difficulties and concepts related to workplace well-being. Learners will be able to identify the stakeholders who are critical to the success of well-being programmes and how employee well-being affects other parts of people management. For example, after completing the lesson, learners will be able to utilise what they’ve learned to create a well-being initiative and measures to ensure and assess its effectiveness.

This Unit is Suitable for Persons Who?

This unit is appropriate for learners with a background in HR and L&D and job experience. However, individuals without academic or professional backgrounds are also eligible because of the CIPD’s impartiality and lack of specific credentials. As a result, the course is appropriate for anyone interested in learning about the well-being principles required for building programmes and cultures that improve the lives of businesses and employees.

Learning Outcomes

1st Learning Objective Those studying the unit must understand the concept of well-being and its value at work. The CIPD requires the following to identify the knowledge:

 

  1. Students must evaluate the difficulties and concepts connected to workplace well-being. They can examine modern well-being issues, including work-life balance, the dynamic nature of work, work settings, and workers.
  2. In addition, learners must describe how to manage well-being to fulfil organisational goals properly. They must first present commonly accepted concepts of well-being and discuss the benefits of putting them into practice. They should also cover well-being management techniques such as employee assistance initiatives, occupational health, and absence management, and how they contribute to organisational effectiveness.
  3. Finally, students must demonstrate their learning by evaluating the advantages of organisational well-being programmes. To meet this need, consider psychological and strategic benefits such as providing wonderful work environments that encourage positive performance, minimise mental stress, and encourage employee engagement, productivity, and retention. Learners must fundamentally connect the advantages to the health and longevity of the organisation.
2nd Learning Objective After learning the ideas and significance of well-being for organisations, students must understand the internal and external elements that influence the well-being of businesses. Therefore, the CIPD asks students to:

 

  1. Identify stakeholder participation in promoting organisational well-being. Learners must investigate how stakeholder participation and roles influence the success of well-being programmes. The stakeholders are senior executives and line managers who deliver people management functions and respond to challenges.
  2. Explain how different aspects of people’s practice and well-being are interconnected. Students must comprehend the relationship between employee well-being and all aspects of HR practices, including role design, stimulation, learning and development, remuneration, and diversity.
  3. Finally, the CIPD requires students to examine internal elements that affect well-being within an organisational context, such as the firm’s strategies, operating sector, personnel needs, and composition. This goal can be achieved by examining various approaches and determining their relative usefulness in various settings. Furthermore, students must discuss the function of well-being as a holistic idea rather than a separate entity.
  4. Identify stakeholder participation in promoting organisational well-being. Learners must investigate how stakeholder participation and roles influence the success of well-being programmes. The stakeholders are senior executives and line managers who deliver people management functions and respond to challenges.
  5. Explain how different aspects of people’s practice and well-being are interconnected. Students must comprehend the relationship between employee well-being and all aspects of HR practices, including role design, stimulation, learning and development, remuneration, and diversity.
  6. Finally, the CIPD requires students to examine internal elements that affect well-being within an organisational context, such as the firm’s strategies, operating sector, personnel needs, and composition. This goal can be achieved by examining various approaches and determining their relative usefulness in various settings. Furthermore, students must discuss the function of well-being as a holistic idea rather than a separate entity.
  7. Identify stakeholder participation in promoting organisational well-being. Learners must investigate how stakeholder participation and roles influence the success of well-being programmes. The stakeholders are senior executives and line managers who deliver people management functions and respond to challenges.
  8. Explain how different aspects of people’s practice and well-being are interconnected. Students must comprehend the relationship between employee well-being and all aspects of HR practices, including role design, stimulation, learning and development, remuneration, and diversity.
  9. Finally, the CIPD requires students to examine internal elements that affect well-being within an organisational context, such as the firm’s strategies, operating sector, personnel needs, and composition. This goal can be achieved by examining various approaches and determining their relative usefulness in various settings. Furthermore, students must discuss the function of well-being as a holistic idea rather than a separate entity.

 

3rd Learning Objective The last prerequisite for those completing unit 5OS07 is to develop a well-being programme for organisational well-being management. The CIPD suggests that you demonstrate this skill by following the steps below:

 

  1. To begin, each trainee must research various well-being projects and match them to the probable needs of their respective organisations. Learners will be able to recognise the demands of the organisations where such efforts take place by identifying well-being initiatives such as health promotion and the construction of health facilities, as well as benefits such as better work-life balance and health.
  2. Next, trainees must create an appropriate programme design for a well-being initiative that meets the company’s demands. Learners must, for example, identify areas of concern, the benefits of implementing well-being programmes in those areas, and the model for measuring programme performance. They must also identify issues and challenges that may impact programme design, such as feasibility, stakeholder input, and determining the best delivery modalities for the programme.
  3. After designing the programme, students must specify how to implement the well-being initiative. This section requires trainees to understand that a programme is only successful if it addresses well-being issues important to the organisations. As a result, when presenting the implementation, trainees must consider organisational and employee characteristics.
  4. Finally, students must explain the techniques to evaluate effective well-being programmes and their importance in generating better organisational outcomes. Regular qualitative and quantitative measures, such as interviews and surveys, are used in these tactics to support continuous well-being improvement.

What Are the Entry Requirements?

There are only two explicit preconditions in the CIPD’s applicant requirement structure. First, all trainees must be 18 years old and have appropriate English skills to respond to and understand coursework and tasks. As a result, the Associate Diploma in People Management is open to all individuals, regardless of whether they have a background in HR or L&D. People having academic or job expertise in People Management or Learning and Development, on the other hand, will find the unit and course themes easier to grasp.

How We Can Help

We are a recognised organisation that provides cutting-edge solutions to professionals and academics. Delivering quality assignment solutions that meet course standards and our client’s specific goals is one of our academic services. We provide a client-directed platform with a wide range of courses. The CIPD Associate Diplomas in people management and learning and development are two topics we cover. We are your undisputed partner for all assignment and course demands because the foundation expects students to be competent in addressing and understanding university level topics and assignments. We have a large pool of flexible HR and L&D professionals who are ready 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to provide excellent services that drive our customers’ performance and, as a result, help them achieve their career goals.

Order Now

Reference

ACAS. (n.d) Health and well-being. Available at: www.acas.org.uk/health-and-wellbeing

Cooper, C. and Hesketh, I. (2019) Well-being at work: how to design, implement and evaluate an effective strategy. London: CIPD Kogan Page.

Cooper, C.L. and Leiter, M.P. (eds) (2017) The Routledge companion to well-being at work. Abingdon: Routledge.

CIPD. (2016) Growing the health and well-being agenda: from first steps to full potential. Policy report. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Available at: www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/culture/wellbeing/health-agenda-report

CIPD and Mind. (2018) People managers’ guide to mental health. Guide. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Available at: www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/culture/wellbeing/mental-health-support-report

CIPD and Simplyhealth. (2020) Health and well-being at work. Survey report. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Available at: www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/culture/wellbeing/health-well-being-work

Dediu, V., Leka, S. and Jain, A. (2018) Job demands, job resources and innovative work behaviour: a European Union study. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology. Vol 27, No 3. pp310-23.

Guest, DE (2017) Human resource management and employee well‐being: towards a new analytic framework. Human Resource Management Journal. Vol 27, No 1, January. pp22-38.

Jordan, H. (2019) The line manager’s role in mental well-being. HR Magazine, 22 August. Available at: www.hrmagazine.co.uk/article-details/theline-managers-role-in-mental-wellbeing

Maslach, C., (2017) Finding solutions to the problem of burnout. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research. Vol 69, No 2, June. pp143-52.

Meechan, F. (2018) Compassion at work toolkit. Working paper. Manchester: National Forum for Health and Wellbeing at Work. Available at: www.researchgate.net/publication/322404395_Compassion_at_Work_Toolkit

Miller, J. (2016) The well-being and productivity link: a significant opportunity for research-into-practice, Journal of Organizational Effectiveness. Vol 3, No 3. pp289-311.

Mitchell, D. (2018) 50 top tools for employee well-being: a complete toolkit for developing happy, healthy, productive and engaged employees. London: Kogan Page.

Office for National Statistics. (2019) Sickness absence in the UK labour market: 2018. Available at: www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourma rket/peopleinwork/labourproductivity/article s/sicknessabsenceinthelabourmarket/2018

Stevenson, D. and Farmer, P. (2017) Thriving at work: the Stevenson/Farmer review of mental health and employers. Report. London: Department of Health and Social Care. Available at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/thriving-at-work-a-review-of-mental-healthandemployers

Suff, R. (2020) Well-being at work. Factsheet. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Available at: www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/culture/wellbeing/factsheet

The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). (n.d) Knowledge Hub. Available at: www.cipd.co.uk/knowledge/culture/wellbeing

Vickerstaff, S., Phillipson, C. and Wilkie, R. (eds) (2013) Work, health and well-being: the challenges of managing health at work. Bristol: Policy Press.

Related Articles:

Need Help? Chat with us!
Start a Conversation
Hi! Click one of our members below to chat on WhatsApp
We usually reply in a few minutes